IMA CALENDAR OF EVENTS AND EXHIBITIONS (September 2011)
 
Information for all events:
 Event Site Address: 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis 46208 (unless otherwise noted)
 Ticket Price: Free (unless otherwise noted)
 Public Phone: 317-923-1331
 Web site: imamuseum.org <http://www.imamuseum.org>
 
TOURS:
 
100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park Tours
Saturdays and Sundays through September
11 a.m. (weather permitting)
Meet at Lake Terrace
Free
Visitors can take an hour-long art and nature-focused tour of 100 Acres.
 
Permanent Collection Tours
The IMA offers free, regularly scheduled tours of the IMA’s permanent collections for all visitors Tuesdays through Sundays at 1 p.m.; Fridays and Sundays at 2:30 p.m.; and Thursdays at 7 p.m. ASL interpreted tours occur each month on the third Sunday at 2:30 p.m and the second Thursday at 7 p.m. Tours meet on the Second Floor at the top of the escalator. Assistive listening devices are available by request. For a schedule of upcoming public tour topics, visit: www.imamuseum.org/programs/tours <http://www.imamuseum.org/programs/tours>
 
Special Exhibition Tours
Special exhibition tours of Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial and Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria are available with exhibition admission. Times vary. For a schedule of upcoming tours, visit: www.imamuseum.org/programs/tours <http://www.imamuseum.org/programs/tours>
 
Lilly House Tours
Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays
2 p.m.
Free
The IMA offers free, regularly scheduled tours of Lilly House, the American Country Place Era home of the late Indianapolis businessman, philanthropist, and collector J. K. Lilly, Jr. Tours meet in the Lilly House lobby.
 
Garden Walks
Saturdays and Sundays
1 p.m.
Free
Guided walks through the IMA’s gardens are offered April-September. Tours meet at the main visitor entrance to Lilly House.
 
100 Acres Birding Tours
September 25
1 p.m.
Meet at Lake Terrace
Free
An expert from the Amos W. Butler Audubon Society (the Indianapolis chapter of the national society) will guide visitors through 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park with a focus on the birds found in the Park. Weather permitting.
 
 
Meditation Hikes
Every Friday
5:30-6:30 p.m.
Meditation Hikes meet at Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion
Free
Each Friday, IMA is the site of Meditation Peace Hikes facilitated by Global Peace Initiatives. In the spirit of mindfulness, the hikes move through the IMA’s grounds, gardens, or 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park, sometimes in silence and sometimes with dialogue. Hikes occur regardless of the weather. Tours depart promptly at 5:30 pm.  For more information, visit www.globalpeaceinitiatives.net <http://www.globalpeaceinitiatives.net/> .
 
ART-MAKING ACTIVITIES:
 
Star(lite)
Saturdays
Noon – 4 p.m.
Star Studio Classroom
Free drop-in visitor art making is available in Star Studio each Saturday. Work with a teaching artist and make your own work of art inspired by the art and ideas on display at the IMA. Projects are designed to be accessible and fun for museum visitors of all ages and levels of experience making art.
 
Art in the Park
Sundays
Noon – 4 p.m.
100 Acres, Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion
Free drop-in visitor art making is available in the Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion of 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art and Nature Park. Work with a teaching artist and make your own work of art inspired by the art and ideas on display at the IMA. Projects are designed to be accessible and fun for museum visitors of all ages and levels of experience making art.
 
EXHIBITIONS:
 
FLOW: Can You See the River?
September 22, 2011-February 26, 2012
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays
Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion and 100 Acres
Free
Mary Miss’ project titled FLOW: Can You See the River? will reveal important and unique elements of the White River water system through a series of installations at stopping points along the river and the canal, engaging visitors and increasing awareness of the watershed and the role that it plays in the life of the city and its inhabitants. The project is the first new work to be commissioned for the 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park since the Park’s opening in June 2010. Miss’ installation in the IMA’s Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion will serve as an introduction to her expansive project outside the museum’s walls. In a continuation of Miss’ tagline for the FLOW-“All property is riverfront property. The river starts at your door.”-visitors can utilize a large map covering the floor of the Entrance Pavilion to locate their homes in relation to local bodies of water. Miss’ indoor installation makes visceral the environmental impact of everyday actions of Indianapolis residents, by illustrating the watershed in relation to homes and demonstrating how easily the White River and other bodies of water can be impacted by the daily activities of locals.
 
Brian McCutcheon: Out of this World
September 9, 2011-March 4, 2012
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays
McCormack Forefront Galleries
Free
Comprised entirely of new works commissioned by the IMA, Brian McCutcheon: Out of this World crafts a story that unfolds throughout the entire exhibition. Created to mimic a children’s book narrative, the exhibition explores the Mercury and Apollo space programs in relation to contemporary culture. Visitors will encounter the first work of the exhibition upon entering the IMA’s Pulliam Family Great Hall, where the base of a currently untitled “flight path” sculpture will be sited. Consisting of a curvilinear metal track, the sculpture traces the imagined trajectory of a toy rocket. With the “launch pad” on the IMA’s second floor, the sculpture will extend three stories before “landing” in the McCormack Forefront Galleries. Within the galleries, Out of this World will continue to evolve as an imaginative narrative, including the launch, space travel, and lunar landing, before arriving at the theme of the splash down-the return to reality at the conclusion of the exhibition.
 
Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria
Through January 16, 2012
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays
Hulman Pavilion, Floor 3
$8 Public, Free for IMA members
Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria presents a glimpse of the extraordinary artistic accomplishments of Ife, the legendary royal city-state of the Yoruba people during the 12th-15th centuries. Technically and visually the artworks of Ife, including near life-size heads and figures of humans in terra cotta, bronze, and copper, are among the most remarkable in the world. This landmark exhibition of African art brings together for the first time these celebrated works, resulting in a display of more than 100 objects that present a fascinating depiction of Ife.
 
Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria is co-organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and Fundación Botín, Santander, Spain, in collaboration with the National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria. The exhibition has been supported, in part, by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts, and by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and Humanities. Conservation at the Spanish Patrimony Conservation Centre is supported, in part, by Fundación Botín.  Locally, the exhibition is underwritten by a grant from the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation. 
 
Venetian Views: American Works on Paper
Through November 27
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays
Alliance Gallery
Free
Planned to coincide with the IMA’s participation in the 54th International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale, this exhibition features works on paper by American artists who traveled to Venice in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Venetian Views presents 28 watercolors, drawings and etchings selected from the IMA’s rich holdings in this area. Among the artists are expatriates John Singer Sargent and James McNeill Whistler as well as Robert Frederick Blum and Frank Duveneck. In addition to exploring the American fascination with the Italian Grand Tour and the glories of Venice, the exhibition addresses the role of Venetian subjects in each artist’s larger body of work.
 
Light, Texture and Solitude: The Art of Tanaka Ryohei
Through October 2
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays
Appel Gallery
Free
Tanaka Ryohei (b. 1933) has established himself as Japan’s foremost etcher. His works combine an immaculate eye for form with intense concentration on visual detail. Tanaka never fails to capture and convey the material quality and texture of his subject matter, whether it is the rough and cracked bark of a pine tree or the graininess of a wooden board. Rich, velvety ink tones, stark whites, deep blacks – sometimes accompanied by vivid touches of color-combine to make images that evoke feelings of quiet solitude.
 
Material World
Through Feburary 6, 2012
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays                                  
Paul Textile and Fashion Arts Galleries
Free
From court dress to couture, the objects in Material World feature extravagant ornamentation of textiles and personal adornment from cultures around the world while highlighting the significance of textiles in displaying wealth, status and power. The exhibition showcases items adorned with luxurious materials including gold and metallic threads, beads, shells, mirrors, semi-precious stones, bones, fur and feathers, ranging from a Buddhist bone apron to Dior and Chanel couture pieces, spanning several centuries to the present day.
 
Selections from Project 35
Through October 30
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays
Holeman Video Gallery
Free
Project 35 consists of videos selected by a team of 35 international curators who strove to select works that acknowledge the adaptability and flexibility of video as a medium for artistic expression. The IMA has chosen to feature three videos created by Robert Cauble, Kota Ezawa and Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz. All of these works engage popular culture through the appropriation of iconic images, personas, historical events and cultural movements.
 
Project 35 is produced and circulated by Independent Curators International (ICI), New York. The exhibition and tour are made possible, in part, by grants from the Cowles Charitable Trust; Foundation for Contemporary Art; the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; The Toby Fund; and ICI Benefactors Agnes Gund, Gerrit and Sydie Lansing, Jo Carole Lauder, and Barbara and John Robinson.
 
Gauguin as Printmaker: The Volpini Suite
Closes September 18
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays
Golden Gallery
Free
With this exhibition, the IMA welcomes a critically important addition to its Pont-Aven School collection, a complete set of Paul Gauguin’s famed Volpini prints. The portfolio of 11 zincographs printed on canary yellow paper was nicknamed ‘Volpini’ after the owner of the Café des Arts in Paris, where the prints were presented during the summer of 1889. The occasion marked the first time that the Pont-Aven School paintings and prints of Gauguin and his colleagues were publicly exhibited. The Volpini Suite, one of the most important printmaking projects of 19th-century France, was Gauguin’s first attempt at printmaking, and the prints reveal his rapid mastery of graphic techniques. The zincographs were created at a pivotal point in Gauguin’s career, just a few months after the summer in Pont-Aven, when he developed the approach that characterizes his mature work. The images represent Gauguin’s thematic interests as well as his travels to Brittany, Arles, and Martinique, and their subjects, motifs, and style offer fascinating points of comparisons to the work Gauguin would create during the rest of his life.
 
The Old Masters
Through December 31
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays
Conant Galleries
Free
The Old Masters provides a quick tour of the history of printmaking from 1470 to 1800 through a selection of 51 of the finest examples from the IMA’s collection of Old Master prints. Works by Dürer, Goltzius, Callot, Rembrandt, and Goya, among others, show how the graphic arts developed as an important form of personal artistic expression. 
 
Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial
Closes September 18
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays
Allen Whitehill Clowes Gallery in Wood Pavilion
$8 Public, Free for IMA members
Thornton Dial is a keen observer of the human spectacle and its narratives of corruption and moral strength, folly and triumph. As an artist, he has spent the last two decades exploring the truth of American history and culture in all its complexities and contradictions. Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial highlights the artist’s significant contribution to the field of American art and show how Dial’s work speaks to the most pressing issues of our time-including the War in Iraq, 9/11 and social issues like racism and homelessness. The exhibition presents 70 of Dial’s large-scale paintings, drawings and found-object sculptures spanning 20 years of his artistic career-including 25 works on view for the first time.  The exhibition is made possible through the generosity of the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation. Additional programming support provided by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.
 
 
FILM:
 
Nollywood Babylon
Thursday, September 1
7 p.m.
The Toby
$5 Public, IMA members and students free
Nigeria’s home-movie industry, Nollywood, is the third largest in the world. This documentary captures the explosive energy, economic power, and cultural influence of the industry. The film drops viewers into the chaos of metropolitan Lagos’ Idumota market, where, among the bustling stalls, films are sold and unlikely stars are born. Unfazed by low budgets, and sometimes propelled by religious agendas, enterprising filmmakers create brash B-movies where voodoo and Christian messages overlay with urban drama, echoing the collision of mysticism and modern culture that Nigerians experience every day. From director Lancelot Oduwa Imasuen to producer Helen Ukpabio, the players in Nollywood Babylon portray a complex and populist movie machine. Nollywood Babylon was an official selection at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival.  Film shown in connection with Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria on view at the IMA.  Film presented by the IUPUI Committee on African and African-American Studies and IMA.  Film shown in DVD. (Closed captioned)

 
Convento
Friday, September 9
8:15 p.m.
100 Acres, Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion
Prices TBD
A favorite at the 2011 South by Southwest Film Festival, Convento is a mesmerizing film about art as a way of life.  This subtle documentary Convento follows Dutch artist Christiaan Zwanikken, who, along with his brother and mother, live creatively in a 400-year old monastery in Portugal called Sao Francisco.  Zwanikken resurrects deceased local wildlife by reanimating the skeletal remains with servomotors and robotic engineering.  His mother and brother pursue their own paths, tending the flora and fauna. Convento’s camera is perpetually in motion, tracking through the monastery and its surrealist storybook landscape, immersing viewers in the daily lives and attitudes of three individuals living at the nexus of art and nature. “Strange, occasionally disturbing, and frequently lovely,” writes Matt Singer of the Independent Film Channel. Film shown in DVD.
 
A Small Act
Thursday, September 15
7 p.m.
The Toby
$5 public, IMA members and students free
(2010, dir. Jennifer Arnold, 88 mins., USA)
When a Swedish Holocaust survivor named Hilde Back decided to sponsor a young, impoverished Kenyan student, she thought nothing of it, paying $15 dollars per term to keep him in primary school. She certainly never expected to hear from him, but many years later, she does. Now, he’s a Harvard grad and UN human rights lawyer, dedicating his life to battling genocide and crimes against humanity. Chris decides to replicate Hilde’s generosity by starting his own scholarship fund, to educate bright kids in his village. But Chris is stunned by Kenya’s failing public schools as only two students pass the test to qualify for sponsorship. Simultaneously, Kenya falls into ethnic-based election violence. With telling parallels to the United States’ education crisis, A Small Act prompts thoughts about altruism, education, and poverty.  A Small Act was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance 2010.  Presented by the IUPUI Committee on African and African-American Studies and IMA. Film shown in DVD.  (Closed captioned)

 
TALKS:
 
Artist Brian McCutcheon
Thursday, September 8
6 p.m.
The Toby
Free
Indianapolis-based conceptual artist Brian McCutcheon discusses the IMA-commissioned works that comprise Brian McCutcheon: Out of this World, his first major solo museum exhibition, opening in the McCormack Forefront Galleries. Grounded in the technological and fantastical world of space exploration, McCutcheon’s show functions as a children’s book narrative replete with rocket trajectories and moon landings.  He’ll discuss the exhibition as well as past works focusing on the intersection of masculinity, consumerism, and suburban iconography, such as Stud (2001) and Trailer Queen II (2003)-involving sculptural objects with customized muscle car paint jobs applied to objects like backyard grills. In celebration of the opening of the exhibition, join the IMA for an outdoor block party.  The event will take place on the Sutphin lawn directly after the talk. Tickets which include food, drinks and music will go on sale August 8.
 
Artist Mary Miss on the City as a Living Laboratory
Thursday, September 22
7 p.m.
The Toby
Free
New York-based artist Mary Miss shares her latest city-wide project, commissioned by the IMA: FLOW Can You See the River?.  FLOW is Miss’ precedent project for City as Living Laboratory: Sustainability Made Tangible through the Arts (CaLL), a framework developed by Miss and Marda Kirn, Executive Director of EcoArts Connections.  CaLL offers a vision for linking the arts with science, urban planning, and education to help us imagine and create cities that redefine how we live our lives, use our resources, communicate, educate, and work.
FLOW is one of many site-specific, sustainability-oriented projects in Miss’ extensive career reshaping the boundaries between sculpture, architecture, landscape design, and installation art.  FLOW includes a series of installations along a six mile stretch of the White River between the IMA and the center of Indianapolis, a mobile Raindrop application, an interactive website and the FLOW: White River Festival. The project’s layers include visual, technological and personal experiences, selected to raise awareness of the interconnectedness of this Indiana waterway to the lives of Indiana residents. Miss discusses the intent of FLOW and her unique art practice involving research into a site’s history and ecology, and collaboration with scientists and multiple community institutions.  Enjoy a reception in The Toby lobby at 6 pm with cash bar and snacks.  (Program will be ASL interpreted) This talk is the kick-off of FLOW: Can You See the River? – a visionary art project conceived by visual artist Mary Miss, commissioned by the IMA, with the FLOW: White River Festival facilitated by EcoArts Connections and more than 20 leading arts, science, environment, and municipal organizations and agencies, including IMA.  More at www.flowcanyouseetheriver.org <http://www.flowcanyouseetheriver.org/> or on Twitter at #FlowIndy.

 
Planet Indy: Maude Barlow on the Right to Clean Water
Thursday, September 29
7 p.m.
The Toby
$8 public, $5 IMA members and students, CAS members free
The world is running out of available fresh water and billions are at risk. Should water be considered a public resource and a human right, or sold on the open market like any product? As Indiana ranks 49th out of 50 states in environmental quality, do Indiana residents have access to clean water and waterways? Global water activist Maude Barlow shares her three-point plan toward a water-secure world and offers new ways of perceiving local water resources. Barlow chairs the boards of the Washington-based Food and Water Watch, and the Council of Canadians; in 2008-09, she served as senior advisor on water to the U.N. General Assembly. (Program will be ASL interpreted) This talk is part of FLOW: Can You See the River? – a visionary art project conceived by visual artist Mary Miss, commissioned by the IMA, with the FLOW: White River Festival facilitated by EcoArts Connections and more than 20 leading arts, science, environment, and municipal organizations and agencies, including IMA.  More at www.flowcanyouseetheriver.org <http://www.flowcanyouseetheriver.org/> or on Twitter at #FlowIndy.

 
PERFORMANCE:
 
Fall Water (Evening in 100 Acres)
Friday, September 23
7:30 p.m.
100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park
$9 public, $5 IMA members and students
On the Fall Equinox, join dancer Oguri and company for new, site-specific dance piece with a live soundscore by composer Paul Chavez with Feltlike.  For this performance, Feltlike will be comprised of local musicians and non-musicians, to make and pick up sound within the environment.  Acknowledging the evening presence of all elements-images, sounds, dancers, audience, water and fire-the dance will flow throughout 100 Acres at the time of dusk.  A Q&A will follow the performance.  Weather: Performance occurs rain or shine.  Parking: All attendees should park at the main IMA campus and take a free shuttle to 100 Acres, as the performance will end at the main IMA building.  Accessibility: This performance progresses throughout the IMA campus and across various terrains.  Questions about accessibility and mobility at this event?  Contact IMA Accessibility Coordinator Jen Mayhill at 923-1331 x 213.  This performance is part of FLOW: Can You See the River? – a visionary art project conceived by visual artist Mary Miss, commissioned by the IMA, with the FLOW: White River Festival facilitated by EcoArts Connections and more than 20 leading arts, science, environment, and municipal organizations and agencies, including IMA.  FLOW includes art installations located throughout Indianapolis, a Raindrop mobile app, and the Festival, which takes place September 22 – October 1, 2011.   More at www.flowcanyouseetheriver.org <http://www.flowcanyouseetheriver.org/>  or on Twitter at #FlowIndy.
 
SPECIAL EVENTS:
 
Chef’s Taste
Thursdays, September 1 and September 15
6:30-8 p.m.
Nourish Café
$35 per person
Join us for themed cocktail receptions in Nourish Café with food and wine stations and tapas. Each month enjoy pairings of specific wines with foods and flavors. See the full menu at nourishevents.com <http://nourishevents.com/> . For reservations, call 317-923-1331 ext. 235.
 
IMA Member Night
Thursday, September 8
5:30-9 p.m.
Nourish Café
Free (For IMA members only)
Every second Thursday of the month, bring your friends and family after work to unwind and enjoy all that the IMA has to offer. Stop in at Nourish Café for happy hour, check out our signature member drink of the night and take advantage of your discount. During Member Night, we also offer an exclusive tour to members and their guests. September’s tour theme is: Gridiron in the Galleries. Kick off the football season by exploring sports-related themes in art. For reservations, email jborgo@imamuseum.org <mailto:jborgo@imamuseum.org> .
 
Meet the 2011 Indianapolis Island resident
Through September 17
100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park
Free
Katherine Ball of Portland, Oregon, takes up residence on Indianapolis Island from Friday, August 12, to Monday, September 26, arriving by bicycle from the west fork of the White River near Muncie. Her six week-long collaborations with park visitors feature activities that draw attention to the ecology of 100 Acres Lake.  Activities will include construction of an all natural water filtration system, water testing, lakeside yoga and bike excursions to nearby locations to explore water issues and challenges.  Visitors can visit the island with the resident to see her ecological interventions on the lake more closely.  Katherine will blog about her experiences throughout her time at the IMA.
 
FLOW Family Day
Saturday, September 24
Noon – 5 p.m.
100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park
Free
Connect with art, science and nature during an afternoon of activities related to the IMA exhibition FLOW: Can you see the River?. Through her exhibition, artist Mary Miss will direct Indianapolis’ attention to the importance of our local waterways. Enjoy fun and interactive experiences that will encourage families to respond to natural environments within 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art and Nature Park. Board the BioBus and discover the organisms found in nearby water systems. Follow dancers of the Susurrus Dance Company inspired by the movement and sound of water. Make streams of humungous flowing bubbles. Create handmade paper from natural materials found in the Park. Explore the Indianapolis Zoo’s Conservation Station to learn ways to protect animals and the environment. Snacks and drinks for sale in the Park provided by Nourish. This talk is the kick-off of FLOW: Can You See the River? – a visionary art project conceived by visual artist Mary Miss, commissioned by the IMA, with the FLOW: White River Festival facilitated by EcoArts Connections and more than 20 leading arts, science, environment, and municipal organizations and agencies, including IMA.  More at www.flowcanyouseetheriver.org <http://www.flowcanyouseetheriver.org/> or on Twitter at #FlowIndy.
 
GENERAL ADMISSION

Indianapolis Museum of Art: Free
Lilly House: Free
 
IMA HOURS
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon-5 p.m. Sundays
(Lilly House closes at 5 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays)
 

PARKING

Visitors are charged a flat fee of $5 to park in the IMA’s underground garage or in the large surface lot. IMA members receive free parking in the garage or on the large surface lot by scanning their IMA membership cards; and visitors who purchase more than $50 worth of merchandise at the Museum Store or the Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse Shop also receive free parking. More than 170 free parking spaces are available in outlying lots at the Museum, including the 100 Acres parking loop.
 
WEBSITE

For regularly updated information about IMA exhibitions, programs and events, visit imamuseum.org <http://www.imamuseum.org> .
 

SHOPS
The Museum Store and the Gallery Shop offer souvenirs, books, handcrafted jewelry and Museum reproductions. The Greenhouse Shop includes a retail garden shop and display area. Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursday and Friday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sunday noon-5 p.m.
 
ACCESSIBILITY
The IMA strives to be accessible to all visitors-physically, emotionally and intellectually. The Museum building and Lilly House are accessible for wheelchair users, strollers and rollators. To borrow a wheelchair, stroller or rollator, visit the IMA box office on the first floor. Open captioning and assistive listening devices available.  ASL interpretation is available during select public programs. Service animals welcome. Family restrooms and nursing mothers room available. Visitors may request ASL interpretation for any program by calling 317-923-1331 at least three weeks prior to the event. For more information, visit www.imamuseum.org/visit/accessibility.
 
DINING
Open during Museum hours, Nourish Café serves a variety of fresh, healthy and seasonal options sourced from local vendors whenever possible. The menu includes hand-crafted soups and salads, artisan sandwiches, pasta dishes, snacks, to-go items, vegetarian and children’s options, and a barista service offering gourmet coffee and other hot beverages. The Café staff can accommodate special dietary needs.
 
LIBRARY
The Stout Reference Library is a non-circulating research library that is open to the public. The collection includes more than 40,000 books and museum publications, plus more than 150 art-related magazines. Call 317-923-1331 for more information.
 
THE DAVIS LAB
The Davis LAB is an interactive space where IMA visitors may view original video content on ArtBabble.org <http://www.artbabble.org> , read the IMA blog, check out IMA images on Flickr, become an IMA fan on Facebook and learn more about the Museum via four computer stations and a theater-style area outfitted with large-screen projection and lounge furniture. Visitors to The Davis LAB are encouraged to offer feedback by rating videos and leaving comments on the IMA blog.
 
OLDFIELDS-LILLY HOUSE & GARDENS
Designated a National Historic Landmark and listed in the National Register of Historic Places, Oldfields-Lilly House & Gardens is an elegant 26-acre estate located on the grounds of the IMA. At the heart of Oldfields is Lilly House, the mansion that was once the home of J.K. Lilly Jr., the late Indianapolis businessman, collector and philanthropist. Lilly House is an historic house museum and has been restored to its 1930s splendor. Oldfields’ magnificent gardens and grounds were designed in the 1920s by Percival Gallagher of the famous landscape architecture firm Olmsted Brothers. A 10-minute orientation video is available.
 
100 ACRES: THE VIRGINIA B. FAIRBANKS ART & NATURE PARK
Adjacent to the Indianapolis Museum of Art and comprised of woodlands, wetlands, meadows and a 35-acre lake, 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park is one of the largest museum art parks in the country and features the ongoing commission of site-responsive artworks. 100 Acres presents art installations and programs that focus on the unique relationships between contemporary art and the natural world.
 
MILLER HOUSE AND GARDEN
In 2009, the IMA acquired Miller House and Garden in Columbus, Indiana, through a generous donation by members of the Miller family. One of the country’s most iconic examples of mid-century Modernist residential architecture, it was designed by Eero Saarinen, with interiors by Alexander Girard, and landscape design by Dan Kiley. The property is the fully realized expression of a modern mid-twentieth-century residence set within an equally important garden. The IMA recently completed a restoration of the house and opened it to the public for the first time in May 2011. Tours are offered daily Tuesday through Saturday at 1 and 3 p.m., and Sundays at 1 p.m.; visitors should arrive at the Columbus Visitors Center at least 30 minutes before their scheduled tour time. Miller House is closed Mondays. Due to limited capacity, advanced reservations are strongly encouraged; tickets are available online at www.imamuseum.org <http://www.imamuseum.org>  and at www.columbus.in.us <http://www.columbus.in.us> . Tickets are $20 per person. To order by phone or to book a group tour, visitors may call (800) 468-6564.  Miller House and Garden is owned and cared for by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Tours at Miller House and Garden are made possible through the Columbus Area Visitors Center.  Miller House and Garden is made possible through the generosity of Members of the Miller Family, Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Foundation and Cummins Foundation.  The inaugural year of Miller House and Garden is sponsored by Herman Miller.